Thursday, February 19, 2009

Slip Space...Hyperreality and Psycogeographies

What
(Paul Virilio’s experience…”returning from San Francisco to Europe”) – ”The experience that prompted this, however–seeing dawn and dusk at the same time–was of being neither within nor without; it was an experience of being between the two, a "between" formed only in the simultaneous presence of the two." 01

Slip Space 02 is a temporal space, or event, existing between physical geographies. This ‘space’ is a hyper-reality, created by the use of ‘tactics,’ 03 or opportunities in time, creating the illusion of simultaneity, existing in more than one place at a given moment. A tactic, as stated by Certeau, “depends on time–it is always on the watch for opportunities that must be seized "on the wing." Whatever it wins, it does not keep. It must constantly manipulate events in order to turn them into "opportunities." 04 One use of tactics, or maneuvers, in everyday life is through the use of everyday high-speed technologies, such as real-time video, mobile phones, passenger jets, etc. 05 These technologies blur the boundaries of physical space reality and create a hyper-reality, which, as stated by Baudrillard, is something by which states itself as real but questions its origin of reality at the same instance. 06

Why
Architecture cannot be viewed as the linear production of static, physical space, but rather a fractured, inebriated lexicon void of a structured narrative. Architecture can be seen as a broken narrative of time-based events. Paul Virilio’s “definition of the event is less in space than in time. P.V's thesis may be simply that time has finally overcome space as our main mode of perception." 07 Then the effects of our perception of simultaneity are that “space is temporal” and requires new ‘modes of operation.’ 08 This idea, of course, is not new. In the 1950’s, Guy Debord and the Situationists created a manifesto by which to discover this type of architecture space with the creation of the dérive, détournement and psycho-geographies, as reactions to the spectacle of a commodity society. 09 “In the Situationist view, situations are actively created moments characterized by ‘a sense of self-consciousness of existence within a particular environment or ambience.’” 10 Then in the 1980’s, the group NATO (Narrative Architecture Today), spearheaded by Nigel Coates took these ideas to further fruition in a struggle to better understand how the city could represent the ‘experiences it contained.’ 11 During that time, Bernard Tschumi was working with the notions of time-space events with the ‘Manhattan Transcripts’ project. His use of collage was seeking to explore this notion of temporal space. 12 The Slow House, and other projects by Dillard + Scofidio also speak to a time-based architecture and what I am referring to as Slip Space. 13 Therefore, with this and other research in mind, I believe there will be room for new design opportunities, in architecture, by understanding the use of everyday time-based ‘tactics’ as it relates to high-speed technologies and spatial relationships. 14

How
I am proposing a project that explores Slip Space in the time-based medium of digital film, motion graphics, green screen and 3D animation software. I will seek a representation that both describes as well as challenges typical linear relationships between spaces, much in the same way Duchamp studies the compression of events in Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2. I am looking at the film as the design itself where you, the participant, are part of the engagement of the event. Therefore, it is my goal to engage you in a type of hyper-reality.

The film will act as a psycho-geography taking the viewer on a journey, much like the book Ecstacity. 10 The film consists of three parts: the overheard conversation as voyeurism and broken narrative, the everyday individual working in an office acting as the ‘voyeur’ 15, and the shots through London. The narrative will be a dérive through the city with a lack of consistent loci, separating the viewer from the typical notion of continuous space. All three parts will be a type of hyper-reality, connected through the use of screens, transitions and other technologies, but generally unrelated. The aim is for the movie to become a form of Slip Space.


References

1. (Victor Burgin, "Indifferent Spaces" (1996), pg. 185 ) Referring to Virilio's, "Improbable Architecture", pg 83. "Paul Virilio, 'returning from San Francisco to Europe,' over the glaciers of Greenland and observes; 'Behind us glow the red fires of dusk and, in the same instant, ahead of us glimmer the green lights of dawn.'. . . . "The experience that prompted this, however–seeing dawn and dusk at the same time–was of being neither within nor without; it was an experience of being between the two, a "between" formed only in the simultaneous presence of the two."

2. Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis, Situation Normal (1998) Slip Space, a project by, investigation the space between gallery and the basement below through various mechanical devices connecting the use of common objects. see.

3. Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis, Situation Normal (1998) pg. 05, 07 "In particular, tactics are the modes of creative opportunity that operate within the gaps and slips of conventional thought and the patterns of everyday life."… "A critical architecture challenges the familiar, seeking out what has been forgotten in the making of the conventions and norms of generic, everyday architecture."

4.
(Micheal de Certeau, "The Practice of Everyday Life" (1984), pg xix) "A tactic insinuates itself into the other's place, fragmentarily, without taking it over in its entirety, without being able to keep it at a distance. It has at its disposal no base where it can capitalize on its advantages, prepare its expansions, and secure independence with respect to circumstances. The "proper" is a victory of space over time. On the contrary, because it does not have a place, a tactic depends on time–it is always on the watch for opportunities that must be seized "on the wing." Whatever it wins, it does not keep. It must constantly manipulate events in order to turn them into "opportunities."

5.
(Victor Burgin, "Indifferent Spaces" (1996), pg. 186 ) “Today ‘the tube’ has extended the shopping street into the upper atmosphere. I am on a flight into Los Angeles. Video projectors have just transmitted live news broadcasts onto screens in the aircraft cabin; I leaf through a shopping catalog provided in the seat pocket in front of me. Above this pocket, inset in the seat back, is a telephone handset. I may use a credit card as a key to release the telephone and call anywhere in the world; I may also use it to order goods from the catalog, which will be wrapped and waiting for me on my deplaning at LAX. Back on the ground, as I head for the baggage claim area, the “terminal’ is itself an agglomeration of video terminals informing me of times and places I may make further connections to other places and other times. “

6.
( Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation (1994)) “Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real" America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle."

7. Paul Virilio, A Landscape of Events (2000) (Bernard Tschumi- Foreword) “His definition () of the event is less in space than in time. P.V's thesis may be simply that time has finally overcome space as our main mode of perception."

8.
Paul Virilio, A Landscape of Events (2000) (Bernard Tschumi- Foreword) "Time, rather than space, is the theme of this book: the collapse of time, the acceleration of time, the reversal of time, the simultaneity of all times. Another title for Virilio's "A Landscape of Events" could have been "Mediated Blitzed." Indeed, rarely has a contemporary writer so engaged in an exacerbated analysis of the acceleration of time, to the point where space itself becomes engulfed in time. Space becomes temporal."

9. (Guy Debord, La Societe du Spectacle, (Paris: Buchet-Chastel, 1967) "The spectacle is not a collection of images," Debord writes. "rather, it is a social relationship between people that is mediated by images."

10. (Simon Ford, The Situationist International: A User’s Guide (1950)) “…to wake up the spectator who has been drugged by spectacular images," "through radical action in the form of the construction of situations," "situations that bring a revolutionary reordering of life, politics, and art". In the situationist view, situations are actively created moments characterized by "a sense of self-consciousness of existence within a particular environment or ambience."

11. Nigel Coates, Marcus Field, Ecstacity (2003)

12. (Neil Spiller, Visionary Architecture (2006)) "Tschumi's polemic was grounded in his assertion that 'there is no space without event,'(Questions of Space, Bernard Tschumi) and it was his collaging of events, his mixing of programmatic considerations and his development of a personal architectural space-time notation that formed his contribution to the progress of twentieth-century architectural vision."

13. Diller +Scofidio, Flesh (1994) pg249 "The Slow House reconsiders issues of optical paranoia which emerged over forty years ago in the growing affinity between the television and the picture window. The designations 'public' and 'private' were put into doubt as television privatized the most public condition, the media, and the picture window publicized the most private, the interior."

14.
(Micheal de Certeau, "The Practice of Everyday Life" (1984), pg xxi)“This mutation makes the text habitable, like a rented apartment. It transforms another person's property into a space borrowed for a moment by a transient. Renters make comparable changes in an apartment they furnish with their acts and memories; as do speakers, in the language into which they insert both the messages of their native tongue and, through their accent, though their own "turns of phrase," etc., their own history; as do pedestrians, in the streets they fill with the forests of their desires and goals."

15
(Guy Debord, La Societe du Spectacle, (Paris: Buchet-Chastel, 1967) "Reading (an image or a text), moreover, seems to constitute the maximal development of the passivity assumed to characterize the consumer, who is conceived of as a voyeur (whether troglodytic or itinerant) in a "show biz society."

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